How the MotivAider Helps Children with ADD, ADHD and Other Attention Problems

The MotivAider works in a remarkably safe and simple way to help children with ADD, ADHD and other attention problems constructively focus their attention.

It's no wonder that children who have trouble keeping their attention constructively focused develop learning, behavior and self-esteem problems.

Here's how an adult who overcame her childhood attention problem described her experience:

"Before I could control my attention, doing even the simplest task felt a lot like trying to sort important papers outside on a very windy day! My attention would constantly drift and wander. Although I was usually going full speed ahead, I was hardly ever on-course. I was always frustrated. And everyone was always frustrated with me. Even when they tried not to show it—and often there was no way to hide it—I knew what my frustrated parents, teachers, siblings and peers were thinking: 'If she would just pay attention, everything would go so much better for her and for us. So, why in the world doesn't she just pay attention?"

There may be no simple answer to the question of why a particular child's attention wanders, but there's no doubt that children benefit immensely from any improvement in their ability to constructively focus their attention.

It can be fairly easy to redirect a child's wandering attention. All it usually takes is a tap on the shoulder or a persuasive personal reminder. The problem is, the child's attention usually wanders off again. And again. And again. And again.

The truth is, unless the child can be exposed to enough of the right reminders, the child's attention will probably spend more time where it doesn't belong than where it does.

The Easy Way to Make Sure a Child is Exposed to Enough of the Right Reminders

The MotivAider is a remarkably simple electronic device that helps children with Attention Deficit Disorder / Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) and other attention problems keep their attention constructively focused.

It works by making sure that a child is always exposed to enough of the right reminders. By consistently and automatically re-directing a child's wandering attention, the MotivAider enables children to effortlessly stay on track.

A safe and gentle alternative or enhancement to other treatment methods, the user-friendly MotivAider not only paves the way for improvements in a child's academic and social performance, it relieves parents, teachers and others of the need to nag.

See a video review by Erin Koerselman, coach of parents of children with ADHD.

The Simple Way It Works

The MotivAider produces a silent signal—a pulsing vibration that's automatically repeated as often as the user selects. The signal is used to send the child a private, personal reminder that redirects the child's attention to the task at hand. By making it possible to precisely adjust what the MotivAider's signal will mean to the child, as well as how often the child will receive signals, the MotivAider assures that the child will be exposed to enough of the right reminders to produce the greatest possible improvement in attention.

The MotivAider can be used both in the classroom and at home to improve learning ability and reduce behavior and socialization problems that result from poor control of attention regardless of the cause.

Get the ingeniously simple tool that quickly, easily and privately changes behavior and habits. At $59.50 or less, the MotivAider comes with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee, a 3-year warranty and free lifetime expert support.
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"Think of it as me calling you and asking, 'Kristen are you on-task right now?' By using the MotivAider, Kristen was able to increase her on-task behavior in the classroom setting."

— Jessica Frieder, Ph.D., Western Michigan University

"All students substantially reduced their off-task behaviors and increased the appropriate attention recruitment behaviors when the self-monitoring procedure [MotivAider use] was implemented."

— Dr. Ya-yu Lo, Associate Professor, Department of Special Education & Child Development, University of North Carolina (Charlotte)